Home / MIGRATION / French Parliament passes tough new immigration laws
African asylum seekers sleeping in the open air in the neighbourhood of La Chapelle in Paris, July 2015. Outdoor encampment of refugees is common in France due to the poor public accommodation provision for asylum seekers. The new laws will make life more difficult for those seeking refuge in the country / Photo: Arun Venugopal/PRI

French Parliament passes tough new immigration laws

The National Assembly in France has passed new immigration laws that toughen up asylum rules by speeding up the application procedure and making it easier to deport people.

The controversial law has brought widespread criticism from human rights defenders and sown rare divisions within French President Emmanuel Macron’s own Republic on the Move (LRM) centrist party.

French lawmakers passed the bill 228 votes to 139, with 24 abstentions on Sunday (22 April) following a marathon debate that lasted 61 hours and attracted around 1,000 amendments.

Some 14 members of the LRM party abstained with another voting against the bill. The Senate is now set to debate it in June.

Macron’s party introduced the bill in February as part of a wider presidential campaign effort to wrestle support away from defeated far-right and anti-immigrant candidate, Marine Le Pen.

It allows authorities to keep child asylum seekers in detention for up to 90 days as they await deportation.

The French bill also reduces the asylum application filing period from 120 days to 90 days and shortens the deadline to launch appeals from one month to 15 days.

Such measures render the application process much more onerous for the asylum seeker and risks unjustly sending home people who require international protection, according to Human Rights Watch.

In 2017, the French national court of asylum granted protection to over 8,000 people who had appealed their negative decision. Around 100,000 applied for asylum last year.

Those given refugee status under the new law will be granted easier access to work.

The move also comes amid a greater push at the EU level to ensure that people denied the right to asylum are sent home, given that only around 36 percent actually leave.

“We need to significantly increase our number of returns, all member states must streamline the return process. Return decisions should not just be given but also enforced,” said EU migration commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos last September.

Nikolaj Nielsen/© EUobserver

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